• Cardiac Electrophysiologist Alan Helmbold, D.O., Joins Cotton O’Neil Heart Center

    Friday July 14, 2017

    Cotton O’Neil is proud to announce that Alan Helmbold, D.O., has joined our medical team and will practice as a cardiac electrophysiologist. His practice will be located at the Cotton O’Neil Heart Center, 920 S.W. Mulvane St. in Topeka.

    Dr. Helmbold is a lieutenant colonel in the United States Army Reserve and has served on active duty for the past 15 years. He attributes his military experience, which includes a combat tour in Iraq and a second combat tour in Afghanistan, as something that sets him apart from others in his field.

    “My military career has taught me how to improvise, to be adaptable, and to think on my feet,” said Dr. Helmbold.

    Dr. Helmbold received his degree in osteopathic medicine at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 2002. He completed an internal medicine residency at Brook Army Medical Center-Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, Texas in 2005, and then practiced internal medicine for two years. He completed a cardiology fellowship at Brook Army Medical Center- Fort Sam Houston in 2010, and then practiced general cardiology for three years. In 2015, he completed a clinical cardiac electrophysiology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, and then practiced clinical cardiac electrophysiology in the Army for the past two years.

    “I consider it a great honor to be trusted by my patients to improve their quality of life,” said Dr. Helmbold. “The field of electrophysiology has numerous procedures that are exciting to perform with each case having its unique challenges.”

    Dr. Helmbold says that he is committed to ensuring the very best care for each of his patients and he strives to treat them as if they were members of his family. Respectful, diligent, thorough, passionate, honest, empathetic, competent and resolute are words that his past patients have used to describe the care he provides.   

    Faith plays an important part in Dr. Helmbold’s life. He enjoys the outdoors and exercising, but the thing he says he enjoys most is spending time with his wonderful family.

    Dr. Helmbold is now accepting new patients. To schedule an appointment, talk to your primary care physician about a referral to this cardiac electrophysiologist.

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  • American Academy of Pediatrics Releases Updated Policy Statement Recommendations for Fruit Juices in Infants, Children and Adolescents

    Monday July 10, 2017

    The American Academy of Pediatrics (APP) released updated policy statement recommendations in May that say some children should be consuming less juice than previously advised. Concern has been expressed about increasing obesity rates and risks for dental problems.

    Pam Harrison, M.D., family medicine physician at the Cotton O’Neil Emporia Clinic, explains that the updated policy statement clarifies that there is virtually no nutritional value for fruit juice, and it should be limited to small amounts for children and generally avoided in infancy.

    “Expensive juice products designed specifically for infants are found to be of no value to their diet,” said Dr. Harrison. “Water and cow’s milk are preferred as the primary fluid sources for children after weaning – with cow’s milk to be given over age one.”

    The APP recommendations include:

    • Juice should not be introduced to infants before one year unless clinically indicated in the management of constipation. Daily intake should be limited to 4 ounces in toddlers ages 1-3 years, 4-6 ounces for those 4-6 years. For those 7-18 years, limit juice intake to 8 ounces or 1 cup of the recommended 2-2.5 cups of fruit servings per day.
    • Toddlers should not be given juice from bottles or easily transportable covered cups that make it easy to consume throughout the day, nor should they be given juice at bedtime.
    • Children should be encouraged to eat whole fruits and educated on the benefit of fiber intake.
    • Families should be educated that human milk and/or infant formula are sufficient to satisfy fluid requirements for infants, and low-fat/nonfat milk and water are sufficient for older children.
    • Consumption of unpasteurized juice products should be strongly discouraged.
    • Grapefruit should be avoided in those taking certain medications.
    • When evaluating children with malnutrition – as well as chronic diarrhea, excessive flatulence, abdominal pain and bloating – pediatricians should determine the amount of juice being consumed.
    • In evaluating risk for dental caries, discuss the relationship between fruit juice and dental decay, and inquire about the amount and means of juice consumption.
    • Routinely discuss the use of fruit juice vs. fruit drinks, and educate older children and parents about the differences.

    The Academy’s goal is for these policies to lead to a decrease in juice consumption, especially in small children, while ensuring an adequate intake of whole fruits. It recognizes that juice may provide some vitamins but lacks the fiber and protein critical for the growth of children.

    Dr. Harrison suggests if you want to offer fruit juice to children, give the real whole fruit, which has fiber as well as juice, or make the juice yourself instead of reaching for sugar-added bottled juice.

    “For a fun alternative and a way to incorporate fresh fruit into your diet, have older children join you in the kitchen and help you make a smoothie,” said Dr. Harrison.

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  • American Academy of Pediatrics Releases Updated Policy Statement Recommendations for Fruit Juices in Infants, Children and Adolescents

    Monday July 10, 2017

    The American Academy of Pediatrics (APP) released updated policy statement recommendations in May that say some children should be consuming less juice than previously advised. Concern has been expressed about increasing obesity rates and risks for dental problems.

    Regan Dulin, D.O., family medicine physician at the Cotton O’Neil Manhattan Clinic, explains that the updated policy statement clarifies that there is virtually no nutritional value for fruit juice, and it should be limited to small amounts for children and generally avoided in infancy.

    “Expensive juice products designed specifically for infants are found to be of no value to their diet,” said Dr. Dulin. “Water and cow’s milk are preferred as the primary fluid sources for children after weaning – with cow’s milk to be given over age one.”

    The APP recommendations include:

    • Juice should not be introduced to infants before one year unless clinically indicated in the management of constipation. Daily intake should be limited to 4 ounces in toddlers ages 1-3 years, 4-6 ounces for those 4-6 years. For those 7-18 years, limit juice intake to 8 ounces or 1 cup of the recommended 2-2.5 cups of fruit servings per day.
    • Toddlers should not be given juice from bottles or easily transportable covered cups that make it easy to consume throughout the day, nor should they be given juice at bedtime.
    • Children should be encouraged to eat whole fruits and educated on the benefit of fiber intake.
    • Families should be educated that human milk and/or infant formula are sufficient to satisfy fluid requirements for infants, and low-fat/nonfat milk and water are sufficient for older children.
    • Consumption of unpasteurized juice products should be strongly discouraged.
    • Grapefruit should be avoided in those taking certain medications.
    • When evaluating children with malnutrition – as well as chronic diarrhea, excessive flatulence, abdominal pain and bloating – pediatricians should determine the amount of juice being consumed.
    • In evaluating risk for dental caries, discuss the relationship between fruit juice and dental decay, and inquire about the amount and means of juice consumption.
    • Routinely discuss the use of fruit juice vs. fruit drinks, and educate older children and parents about the differences.

    The Academy’s goal is for these policies to lead to a decrease in juice consumption, especially in small children, while ensuring an adequate intake of whole fruits. It recognizes that juice may provide some vitamins but lacks the fiber and protein critical for the growth of children.

    Dr. Dulin suggests if you want to offer fruit juice to children, give the real whole fruit, which has fiber as well as juice, or make the juice yourself instead of reaching for sugar-added bottled juice.

    “For a fun alternative and a way to incorporate fresh fruit into your diet, have older children join you in the kitchen and help you make a smoothie,” said Dr. Dulin.

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  • Stormont Vail Health Welcome Baby Jubilee: Invitation to Media

    Wednesday June 21, 2017

    Media: If you would like to attend, please contact Niki Maloney, communications manager, at (785) 249-2721 and she will make arrangements to meet you in the main entrance lobby and escort you over to the event. 

    Stormont Vail Health will host an open house from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. tonight for expecting moms and women thinking about having a baby. Moms-to-be will have the opportunity to speak with Stormont Vail professionals, including Birthplace staff who will provide information on the Birthplace, Breastfeeding Clinic, Neonatal Intensive Care (NIC), Maternal Fetal Medicine (MFM), pediatric services and delivery services available at Stormont Vail Health.

    Tours of the Birthplace, Breastfeeding Clinic, NIC and MFM will be available. Local individuals and organizations will be available to discuss child and baby services offered in the community. Expectant moms may register to win either a Medela breast pump or a $250 gift card to Babies R Us along with a variety of other prizes.

    Dads, grandparents, partners and family who will spend time with the baby are welcome to attend and will have the opportunity to get their Tdap vaccination. Tdap is a vaccination that prevents tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis and is highly recommended for anyone who will be in the presence of a newborn.

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  • Safe Family Fun in the Summer Sun

    Tuesday June 20, 2017

    As temperatures outside rise, so should our attention to summer safety as families enjoy the lazy days of summer.        

    Whatever your plans are between Memorial Day and Labor Day, Cotton O’Neil Manhattan family medicine physician, Dr. Regan Dulin, D.O., has some Safe Kids Worldwide safety tips to share.  

    “Whether you plan to spend some R&R in the backyard or load up the family vehicle for a road trip, summer can best be enjoyed when you plan out some ways to keep your adventures as safe as they can be,” said Dr. Dulin.

    Here are some tips to consider.

    Grilling Safety:

    • Position the grill well away from siding, deck railings, out from under eaves and overhanging branches and a safe distance from lawn games, play areas and foot traffic.
    • Keep children and pets away from the grill area by declaring a three-foot “kid-free zone” around the grill.
    • Keep all matches and lighters away from children. Teach your children to report any loose matches or lighters to an adult immediately.

    Heat Exhaustion and Heat Stroke:

    According to Safe Kids Worldwide, every 10 days, across the United States, a child dies from being left in a hot car. It only takes a few minutes for a car to heat up and become deadly to a child inside. As summer temperatures rise, more kids are at risk.

    “Create reminders for yourself,” said Dr. Dulin. “When you put a child in the back seat place one of their things, like a shoe or favorite stuffed toy, up in the front seat with you so that reminds you that they are in the back. You could also place your cell phone, purse or one of your personal items in the back with the child so you have to go into the back seat first when you exit the car.”

    Water Safety:

    Dr. Dulin suggests you assign an adult to watch children around water. Whether a public pool or in a backyard, don’t’ assume someone else is watching them. Use a lanyard or fun hat that marks the person whose sole responsibility is watching swimmers.

    Safe Kids Worldwide offers a free download for a Water Watcher Card that identifies someone at all times as the designated responsible adult to keep an eye on kids in the water at all times. Other tips include:

    • Swimming aids such as water wings or noodles are fun toys for kids, but they are not appropriate to be used in place of a U.S. Coast Guard-approved life jacket.
    • Age appropriate and complexion appropriate sunscreen should be applied 30 minutes before sun exposure and needs to be reapplied every two hours after that. Dr. Dulin recommends zinc oxide. It is safe for all.

    Road Trip Safety Tips:

    “Adults should set good examples for children and make sure they are buckled up every time they are in a vehicle,” said Dr. Dulin. “It is the single most important thing a family can do to stay safe in the car.”

    Seventy-three percent of car seats are not used or installed correctly, so before you hit the road, check your car seat. Safe Kids Worldwide has an online Ultimate Car Seat Guide to help protect kids on the move.         

    For these and other safety tips, and to find the Water Watcher Card or Ultimate Car Seat Guide, visit www.safekidsworldwide.org.

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  • Safe Family Fun in the Summer Sun

    Friday June 16, 2017

    As temperatures outside rise, so should our attention to summer safety as families enjoy the lazy days of summer.        

    Whatever your plans are between Memorial Day and Labor Day, Cotton O’Neil Emporia family medicine physician, Dr. Robert Stewart, M.D., has some Safe Kids Worldwide safety tips to share.  

    “Whether you plan to spend some R&R in the backyard or load up the family vehicle for a road trip, summer can best be enjoyed when you plan out some ways to keep your adventures as safe as they can be,” said Dr. Stewart.

    Here are some tips to consider.

    Grilling Safety:

    • Position the grill well away from siding, deck railings, out from under eaves and overhanging branches and a safe distance from lawn games, play areas and foot traffic.
    • Keep children and pets away from the grill area by declaring a three-foot “kid-free zone” around the grill.
    • Keep all matches and lighters away from children. Teach your children to report any loose matches or lighters to an adult immediately.

    Heat Exhaustion and Heat Stroke:

    According to Safe Kids Worldwide, every 10 days, across the United States, a child dies from being left in a hot car. It only takes a few minutes for a car to heat up and become deadly to a child inside. As summer temperatures rise, more kids are at risk.

    “Create reminders for yourself,” said Dr. Stewart. “When you put a child in the back seat place one of their things, like a shoe or favorite stuffed toy, up in the front seat with you so that reminds you that they are in the back. You could also place your cell phone, purse or one of your personal items in the back with the child so you have to go into the back seat first when you exit the car.”

    Water Safety:

    Dr. Stewart suggests you assign an adult to watch children around water. Whether a public pool or in a backyard, don’t’ assume someone else is watching them. Use a lanyard or fun hat that marks the person whose sole responsibility is watching swimmers.

    Safe Kids Worldwide offers a free download for a Water Watcher Card that identifies someone at all times as the designated responsible adult to keep an eye on kids in the water at all times. Other tips include:

    • Swimming aids such as water wings or noodles are fun toys for kids, but they are not appropriate to be used in place of a U.S. Coast Guard-approved life jacket.
    • A large portion of boating accidents each year involve alcohol consumption by both boat operators and passengers. To keep you and your loved ones safe, it is strongly recommended not to drink alcoholic beverages while boating.

    Road Trip Safety Tips:

    “Adults should set good examples for children and make sure they are buckled up every time they are in a vehicle,” said Dr. Stewart. “It is the single most important thing a family can do to stay safe in the car.”

    Seventy-three percent of car seats are not used or installed correctly, so before you hit the road, check your car seat. Safe Kids Worldwide has an online Ultimate Car Seat Guide to help protect kids on the move.

    For these and other safety tips, and to find the Water Watcher Card or Ultimate Car Seat Guide, visit www.safekidsworldwide.org.

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  • Welcome Baby Jubilee Provides Valuable Information for Expecting Mothers

    Thursday June 15, 2017

    Stormont Vail Health will host an open house from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, June 21, for expecting moms and women thinking about having a baby. Moms-to-be will have the opportunity to speak with Stormont Vail professionals, including Birthplace staff who will provide information on the Birthplace, Breastfeeding Clinic, Neonatal Intensive Care (NIC), Maternal Fetal Medicine (MFM), pediatric services and delivery services available at Stormont Vail Health.

    Tours of the Birthplace, Breastfeeding Clinic, NIC and MFM will be available. Local individuals and organizations will be on hand to discuss child and baby services offered in the community. Expectant moms can register to win either a Medela breast pump or a $250 gift card to Babies R Us along with a variety of other prizes.

    Dads, grandparents, partners and family who will spend time with the baby are welcome to attend and will have the opportunity to get their Tdap vaccination. Tdap is a vaccination that helps prevent tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis and is highly recommended for anyone who will be in the presence of a newborn.

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