Showing all Releases for January 2017

  • New Guidelines Indicate Introducing Peanut-Containing Products to Infants Can Prevent Allergies

    Tuesday January 31, 2017

    The National Institutes of Health issued new guidelines earlier this month saying most babies should regularly eat peanut-containing foods starting around 6 months of age, some as early as 4 months.        

    The recommendations are based on landmark research that found early exposure is far more likely to protect babies from developing peanut allergies than to harm them.  

    “People with allergies have been desensitizing themselves for many years by getting small doses of things they are allergic to,” said Preeti Singh, M.D., Cotton O’Neil Manhattan. “In fact, this study isn’t too different than that, and if successful, can prevent many deaths and complications in our general population. We have peanut exposure in chocolate, for example, and it is hard for most children to resist candies.”

    The guidelines explain how exactly to introduce infants to age-appropriate peanut products depending on whether they’re at high, moderate or low risk of becoming allergic as they grow.

    Whole peanuts or even a spoonful of creamy peanut butter may be a choking hazard for infants and is not recommended for them. Instead, the guidelines include options such as watered-down peanut butter or easy-to-gum peanut-flavored “puff” snacks.

    Babies at high risk – because they have a severe form of skin rash, eczema or egg allergies – need a check-up before exposure and should receive their first taste in the doctor’s office. For other babies, most parents can start adding peanut-containing foods to their diet much like they introduce oatmeal or mashed fruits and vegetables. Giving any peanut-containing food should always be done when a parent or caregiver can monitor the infant for up to two hours after trying the food to make sure there are no reactions such as itching, rash or difficulty breathing. If there is a reaction, be sure to take the infant to a doctor.

    back to top

  • Stormont Vail Health Chief Human Resources Officer to Retire in 2017

    Tuesday January 31, 2017

    Bernard H. Becker, SPHR(L), SHRM-SCP, vice president and chief human resources officer at Stormont Vail Health, has announced his intent to retire before October 2017. Becker oversees Recruitment, Compensation & Benefits, Employee Relations, Employee Health, Education & Staff Development, Medical Education, the Stauffer Health Sciences Library, Spiritual Care, Volunteer Services & Auxiliary and the child care center.

    “While I am sad to be leaving an organization I’m so proud of, I am also excited to spend more time with my wife Barb and our family,” Becker said.

     Becker has been a part of Stormont Vail Health for more than 19 years. He joined Stormont Vail from 1980-1983 as the assistant director of personnel. He re-joined the system in 2001 as the vice president of Human Resources, later changing titles to vice president and chief human resources officer.

    “Bernie has been a great leader for Stormont Vail Health, contributing to our growth,” said Randy Peterson, president and chief executive officer. “During his tenure we’ve grown from about 2,500 employees to more than 4,800.”

    Becker has almost 40 years of human resources experience and has served as the chief human resources officer for multiple hospitals and health care systems in Michigan and Missouri. Additionally, Becker worked for three years as vice president and a consultant for a national health care human resources and labor relations firm. Born and raised in Kanas City and a Vietnam War-era U.S. Army veteran, Becker has a bachelor’s degree in Personnel Administration and Psychology from the University of Kansas and a master’s degree in Personnel Management from Central Michigan University.

    A retirement reception will be announced at a later date. Stormont Vail Health is conducting a nationwide search for Becker’s replacement.

    back to top

  • New Guidelines Indicate Introducing Peanut-Containing Products to Infants Can Prevent Allergies

    Thursday January 26, 2017

    The National Institutes of Health issued new guidelines earlier this month saying most babies should regularly eat peanut-containing foods starting around 6 months of age, some as early as 4 months.        

    The recommendations are based on landmark research that found early exposure is far more likely to protect babies from developing peanut allergies than to harm them.  

    “This is an exciting development in the allergy field,” said Christy Jansen, M.D., pediatrician at Cotton O’Neil Emporia. “Peanut allergy affects one to two percent of children and can be lifelong. It can cause anxiety in parents as well. The ability to perhaps prevent peanut allergy by early exposure is great.”

    The guidelines explain how exactly to introduce infants to age-appropriate peanut products depending on whether they’re at high, moderate or low risk of becoming allergic as they grow.

    Whole peanuts or even a spoonful of creamy peanut butter may be a choking hazard for infants and it is not recommended for them. Instead, the guidelines include options such as watered-down peanut butter or easy-to-gum peanut-flavored “puff” snacks.

    Babies at high risk – because they have a severe form of skin rash eczema or egg allergies – need a check-up before exposure and should receive their first taste in the doctor’s office. For other babies, most parents can start adding peanut-containing foods to the diet much like they introduce oatmeal or mashed fruits and vegetables. Giving any peanut-containing food should always be done when a parentor caregiver can monitor the infant for up to two hours after they try the food to make sure there are no reactions such as itching, rash or difficulty breathing. If there is, be sure to take them to a doctor.

    Dr. Jansen encourages parents to contact their child’s physician to discuss how to introduce peanuts into their child’s diet as there are different recommendations depending on health history.

    back to top