Showing all Releases for July 2017

  • Cardiac Electrophysiologist Alan Helmbold, D.O., Joins Cotton O’Neil Heart Center

    Friday July 14, 2017

    Cotton O’Neil is proud to announce that Alan Helmbold, D.O., has joined our medical team and will practice as a cardiac electrophysiologist. His practice will be located at the Cotton O’Neil Heart Center, 920 S.W. Mulvane St. in Topeka.

    Dr. Helmbold is a lieutenant colonel in the United States Army Reserve and has served on active duty for the past 15 years. He attributes his military experience, which includes a combat tour in Iraq and a second combat tour in Afghanistan, as something that sets him apart from others in his field.

    “My military career has taught me how to improvise, to be adaptable, and to think on my feet,” said Dr. Helmbold.

    Dr. Helmbold received his degree in osteopathic medicine at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 2002. He completed an internal medicine residency at Brook Army Medical Center-Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, Texas in 2005, and then practiced internal medicine for two years. He completed a cardiology fellowship at Brook Army Medical Center- Fort Sam Houston in 2010, and then practiced general cardiology for three years. In 2015, he completed a clinical cardiac electrophysiology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, and then practiced clinical cardiac electrophysiology in the Army for the past two years.

    “I consider it a great honor to be trusted by my patients to improve their quality of life,” said Dr. Helmbold. “The field of electrophysiology has numerous procedures that are exciting to perform with each case having its unique challenges.”

    Dr. Helmbold says that he is committed to ensuring the very best care for each of his patients and he strives to treat them as if they were members of his family. Respectful, diligent, thorough, passionate, honest, empathetic, competent and resolute are words that his past patients have used to describe the care he provides.   

    Faith plays an important part in Dr. Helmbold’s life. He enjoys the outdoors and exercising, but the thing he says he enjoys most is spending time with his wonderful family.

    Dr. Helmbold is now accepting new patients. To schedule an appointment, talk to your primary care physician about a referral to this cardiac electrophysiologist.

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  • American Academy of Pediatrics Releases Updated Policy Statement Recommendations for Fruit Juices in Infants, Children and Adolescents

    Monday July 10, 2017

    The American Academy of Pediatrics (APP) released updated policy statement recommendations in May that say some children should be consuming less juice than previously advised. Concern has been expressed about increasing obesity rates and risks for dental problems.

    Pam Harrison, M.D., family medicine physician at the Cotton O’Neil Emporia Clinic, explains that the updated policy statement clarifies that there is virtually no nutritional value for fruit juice, and it should be limited to small amounts for children and generally avoided in infancy.

    “Expensive juice products designed specifically for infants are found to be of no value to their diet,” said Dr. Harrison. “Water and cow’s milk are preferred as the primary fluid sources for children after weaning – with cow’s milk to be given over age one.”

    The APP recommendations include:

    • Juice should not be introduced to infants before one year unless clinically indicated in the management of constipation. Daily intake should be limited to 4 ounces in toddlers ages 1-3 years, 4-6 ounces for those 4-6 years. For those 7-18 years, limit juice intake to 8 ounces or 1 cup of the recommended 2-2.5 cups of fruit servings per day.
    • Toddlers should not be given juice from bottles or easily transportable covered cups that make it easy to consume throughout the day, nor should they be given juice at bedtime.
    • Children should be encouraged to eat whole fruits and educated on the benefit of fiber intake.
    • Families should be educated that human milk and/or infant formula are sufficient to satisfy fluid requirements for infants, and low-fat/nonfat milk and water are sufficient for older children.
    • Consumption of unpasteurized juice products should be strongly discouraged.
    • Grapefruit should be avoided in those taking certain medications.
    • When evaluating children with malnutrition – as well as chronic diarrhea, excessive flatulence, abdominal pain and bloating – pediatricians should determine the amount of juice being consumed.
    • In evaluating risk for dental caries, discuss the relationship between fruit juice and dental decay, and inquire about the amount and means of juice consumption.
    • Routinely discuss the use of fruit juice vs. fruit drinks, and educate older children and parents about the differences.

    The Academy’s goal is for these policies to lead to a decrease in juice consumption, especially in small children, while ensuring an adequate intake of whole fruits. It recognizes that juice may provide some vitamins but lacks the fiber and protein critical for the growth of children.

    Dr. Harrison suggests if you want to offer fruit juice to children, give the real whole fruit, which has fiber as well as juice, or make the juice yourself instead of reaching for sugar-added bottled juice.

    “For a fun alternative and a way to incorporate fresh fruit into your diet, have older children join you in the kitchen and help you make a smoothie,” said Dr. Harrison.

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  • American Academy of Pediatrics Releases Updated Policy Statement Recommendations for Fruit Juices in Infants, Children and Adolescents

    Monday July 10, 2017

    The American Academy of Pediatrics (APP) released updated policy statement recommendations in May that say some children should be consuming less juice than previously advised. Concern has been expressed about increasing obesity rates and risks for dental problems.

    Regan Dulin, D.O., family medicine physician at the Cotton O’Neil Manhattan Clinic, explains that the updated policy statement clarifies that there is virtually no nutritional value for fruit juice, and it should be limited to small amounts for children and generally avoided in infancy.

    “Expensive juice products designed specifically for infants are found to be of no value to their diet,” said Dr. Dulin. “Water and cow’s milk are preferred as the primary fluid sources for children after weaning – with cow’s milk to be given over age one.”

    The APP recommendations include:

    • Juice should not be introduced to infants before one year unless clinically indicated in the management of constipation. Daily intake should be limited to 4 ounces in toddlers ages 1-3 years, 4-6 ounces for those 4-6 years. For those 7-18 years, limit juice intake to 8 ounces or 1 cup of the recommended 2-2.5 cups of fruit servings per day.
    • Toddlers should not be given juice from bottles or easily transportable covered cups that make it easy to consume throughout the day, nor should they be given juice at bedtime.
    • Children should be encouraged to eat whole fruits and educated on the benefit of fiber intake.
    • Families should be educated that human milk and/or infant formula are sufficient to satisfy fluid requirements for infants, and low-fat/nonfat milk and water are sufficient for older children.
    • Consumption of unpasteurized juice products should be strongly discouraged.
    • Grapefruit should be avoided in those taking certain medications.
    • When evaluating children with malnutrition – as well as chronic diarrhea, excessive flatulence, abdominal pain and bloating – pediatricians should determine the amount of juice being consumed.
    • In evaluating risk for dental caries, discuss the relationship between fruit juice and dental decay, and inquire about the amount and means of juice consumption.
    • Routinely discuss the use of fruit juice vs. fruit drinks, and educate older children and parents about the differences.

    The Academy’s goal is for these policies to lead to a decrease in juice consumption, especially in small children, while ensuring an adequate intake of whole fruits. It recognizes that juice may provide some vitamins but lacks the fiber and protein critical for the growth of children.

    Dr. Dulin suggests if you want to offer fruit juice to children, give the real whole fruit, which has fiber as well as juice, or make the juice yourself instead of reaching for sugar-added bottled juice.

    “For a fun alternative and a way to incorporate fresh fruit into your diet, have older children join you in the kitchen and help you make a smoothie,” said Dr. Dulin.

    back to top