• Stormont Vail Health Welcomes Family Medicine at Tallgrass and Immediate Care at Tallgrass to Cotton O’Neil Family

    Friday March 10, 2017

    Stormont Vail Health announces the purchase of Family Medicine, Immediate Care and Occupational Medicine at Tallgrass located at 601 S.W. Corporate View Rd., Suite 200, in Topeka.

    Current Family Medicine at Tallgrass practicing physicians, Betsy Johns, M.D., and Karen Bruce, M.D., will become Cotton O’Neil providers and will continue to see all current primary care, urgent care and worker’s compensation patients starting June 12, 2017.

    Dr. Johns received her medical degree from Hahnemann University and completed residency in family medicine at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia. Dr. Johns is board certified in family medicine. She also received a Master of Public Health from the University of Pittsburgh and has experience teaching family medicine residents.

    Dr. Bruce received her medical degree from the University of Washington and completed residency training in family medicine at East Carolina University in Greenville, North Carolina. Dr. Bruce taught at East Carolina University School of Medicine for two years before moving to Topeka to help start the Family Medicine Residency Program in Topeka. She is board certified in family medicine.

    “We are very excited to have these two physicians and their team join the Cotton O’Neil family,” said Deb Yocum, vice president and clinic operations officer for Stormont Vail Health. “At Stormont Vail Health and Cotton O’Neil we are not just a family, we are a team. In this era of providing patient-centered care to an entire population, it is important that providers work together as a team to keep patients healthy. That team is also important to ensure any illness or injury is treated quickly and completely to allow the patient to get back to their life.”

    In addition to the two physicians, the clinic staff includes five full-time and two part- time midlevel providers who will continue to see patients.

    All current employees of the clinic will become Stormont Vail Health employees and both physicians will be accepting new Cotton O’Neil patients. Patients may call (785) 234-0880 or (785) 295-4500 to set up a new appointment.

    The new name of the location will be Cotton O’Neil Corporate View. The location has onsite X-ray and Laboratory services and will accept most major insurance plans. Patients will also have access to MyChart, a free service through Stormont Vail Health that gives patients direct, online access to their medical records. Patients can view medical records, manage appointments, request prescription renewals, and stay in touch with their physicians.

    “Patients will soon appreciate having their electronic medical records available at every step from their primary care physician’s office to specialty care office and at the hospital if that level of care becomes necessary,” said Yocum.

    “Both Dr. Bruce and I are happy to be joining the Cotton O’Neil family of providers,” said Dr. Johns. “Joining this team allows us to continue to help each patient become healthier with personalized attention and creates new opportunities for providing quality medical care in our community.”

    Tallgrass Anesthesiology Associates, Tallgrass Orthopedics and Sports Medicine, LLC, and Tallgrass Surgical Center, LLC are not part of the acquisition and will continue to operate separately.

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  • Stormont Vail Foundation Supports Nursing Education

    Friday March 3, 2017

    The Stormont Vail Foundation was pleased to fund nursing scholarships totaling $80,100 for 87 students at the Baker University School of Nursing, Stormont Vail Campus, for the Spring 2017 semester. Congratulations to the following nursing students who were awarded scholarship assistance.

    Avis Van Lew Nursing Scholarship

    Jessica Abendroth, Carbondale, Kansas

    Rebecca Brown, Topeka, Kansas 

    June D. Billingham Nursing Scholarship

    Gabrielle Betsch, Olathe, Kansas 

    Blanche Bryden Nursing Scholarship

    Heidi Hayen, Topeka, Kansas

    Caring Hearts Nursing Scholarship

    Chase Winter, Augusta, Kansas

    Carol Perry-Lumb Nursing Scholarship          

    Tanner Mihesuah, Flagstaff, Arizona                                                                                                 

    Carson Family Nursing Scholarship                  

    Kayla Bales, Muscotah, Kansas               

    Christ/Wolff Nursing Scholarship                                                                           

    LaTeka Allen, Overland Park, Kansas  

    Andrea Barton, Manhattan, Kansas

    Jordyn Beck, Topeka, Kansas

    Alisa Becker, McPherson, Kansas                                                                                                                    

    Jillian Benson, Lenexa, Kansas                                                                                      

    Emily Brent, Topeka, Kansas

    Brenna Cook, Leawood, Kansas           

    Melissa Cushing, Topeka, Kansas

    Taylor Dunagan, Tucson, Arizona

    Tara Folsom, Lawrence, Kansas

    Lydia Hardin, Olathe, Kansas                                                                                                          

    Alexis Hartzog, Wichita, Kansas

    Michelle Haug, Baileyville, Kansas

    Heidi Hayen, Topeka, Kansas

    Molly Hiett, Leawood, Kansas

    Sarah Hightree, Lawrence, Kansas

    Stephanie Hinchey, DeSoto, Kansas

    Katelynn Hoobler, Horton, KS

    Cassidy Hulsing, Baileyville, Kansas

    Lakisha Irwin, Raytown, Missouri

    Samantha Max, Manhattan, Kansas

    Shannon Maxwell, Auburn, Kansas

    Shelly Nichols, Kansas City, Kansas

    Carrie Pierpont, Lecompton, Kansas

    Casey Pierron, Topeka, Kansas

    Dylan Price, Wellsville, Kansas

    Kristen Queen, Manhattan, Kansas

    Cheyenne Ratner, Topeka, Kansas

    Erica Ray, Topeka, Kansas

    Sarah Reedy, McPherson, Kansas

    Jacey Rottinghaus, Seneca, Kansas

    LaTasha Scales, Hutchinson, Kansas

    Maceyn Schreiber, Stafford, Kansas    

    Grace Sexton, Abilene, Kansas

    Bailey Snyder, Manhattan, Kansas

    Anthony Stapleton, Topeka, Kansas

    Jodi Stegman, Topeka, Kansas

    Lidia Strecker, Lawrence, Kansas

    Christina Taylor, McPherson, Kansas

    Skyler Taylor, Kansas City, Kansas

    Jeris Thomas, Topeka, Kansas

    Molly Thomas, Topeka, Kansas

    Tori Tomlinson, Osage City, Kansas

    Lisa Tran, Wichita, Kansas

    Corey True, Beloit, Kansas

    Samantha Twenhafel, Nortonville, Kansas

    Lindsey Unrein, Shawnee, Kansas

    Sydney Wedel, Minneapolis, Kansas

    Chase Winter, Augusta, Kansas

    Conkling-Hussey Nursing Scholarship             

    Regina Georgeson, Topeka, Kansas

    Kaysha Green, Topeka, Kansas

    Cotton O’Neil Clinic 20th Anniversary Nursing Scholarship

    Ilina Kay, Forest Hill, New York

    Dean Kathleen L. Harr Nursing Scholarship

    Ilina Kay, Forest Hills, New York                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    

    Emery A. Dains Nursing Scholarship

    Morgan Koelzer, Silver Lake, Kansas

    Klemmer Endowed Nursing Scholarship

    Lauren Burks, Valley Center, Kansas

    Lawrence Gabel Nursing Scholarship

    Shelly Nichols, Kansas City, Kansas

    Marjorie Groll Nursing Scholarship

    Addison Ellis, Lawrence, Kansas

    Alexis Hartzog, Wichita, Kansas

    McKenzie Hartzog, Wichita, Kansas

    Dr. Charles S. & Doris F. Joss Nursing Scholarship

    Frankie Farrant, Meriden, Kansas

    Baleigh Haag, Wichita, Kansas

    Morgan Hofmeister, Overland Park, Kansas

    Kohl’s Family Nursing Scholarship

    Alisa Becker, McPherson, Kansas

    Mary B. Storey Medcalf Nursing Scholarship

    Katelynn Hoobler, Horton, Kansas       

    Schane/Winans Nursing Scholarship

    Ryan Debus, Meriden, Kansas

    Security Benefit Group Nursing Scholarship

    Katelynn Hoobler, Horton, Kansas

    Stormont Vail Health Auxiliary Nursing Scholarship

    Kelli Bauman, Sabetha, Kansas

    Stormont Vail Foundation Nursing Scholarship

    Emily Brent, Topeka, Kansas

    Jamie Crockett, Merrillville, Indiana

    Rachel Dobbins, Kansas City, Missouri

    Taylor Dunagan, Tucson, Arizona

    Abbigail Eisenhut, Topeka, Kansas

    Lydia Hardin, Olathe, Kansas

    Lakisha Irwin, Raytown, Missouri

    Julie Johnson, Renton, Washington

    Savannah Keller, Manhattan, Kansas

    Sabrina Knoll, Eudora, Kansas

    Taylor Knoth, Salina, Kansas

    Amanda Lasswell, St. Marys, Kansas

    Megan Lee, Topeka, Kansas

    Sarah Ludwig-Eatmon, Topeka, Kansas

    Cambry Lynch, Lawrence, Kansas

    Chelsey Mann, St. Joseph, Missouri

    Kaitlin McAlister, Perry, Kansas

    Jessica McKenzie, Lawrence, Kansas

    Allyson Moore, Lenexa, Kansas

    Jamesha Murry, Lawrence, Kansas

    Karen Nissen, Lawrence, Kansas

    Riley Obetz, Overland Park, Kansas

    Heidi Prockish, Westmoreland, Kansas

    Grace Sexton, Abilene, Kansas

    Hailey Stapleton, Topeka, Kansas

    Woman’s Club Nursing Scholarship

    Alexis Hartzog, Wichita, Kansas

    Erinn Steere, Topeka, Kansas 

    30th Anniversary Nursing Scholarship

    Carrie Pierpont, Lecompton, Kansas

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  • Welcome Baby Jubilee Provides Valuable Information for Expecting Mothers

    Thursday February 23, 2017

    Stormont Vail Health will host an open house from 2 to 4 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 26, for expecting moms and women thinking about having a baby. Moms-to-be will have the opportunity to speak with Stormont Vail professionals, including Birthplace staff who will provide information on the Birthplace, Breastfeeding Clinic, Neonatal Intensive Care (NIC), Maternal Fetal Medicine (MFM), pediatric services and delivery services available at Stormont Vail Health.

    Tours of the Birthplace, Breastfeeding Clinic, NIC and MFM will be available. Local individuals and organizations will be on hand to discuss child and baby services offered in the community. Expectant moms can register to win either a Medela breast pump or a $250 gift card to Babies R Us along with a variety of other prizes.

    “This event is a great way to learn about what to expect when you are expecting, “ said Libby Rosen, PhD, RN, IBCLC, Baker School of Nursing professor and childbirth class instructor for Stormont Vail Health. “Expecting mothers and their support members have an opportunity to meet our Birthplace team, who are ready to help Mom have the birth experience and good start that she is looking for. Information will be available about classes that will provide hands-on practice for the family. The biggest reported concerns of new families center around feeding and sleeping information for their new baby. We cover both of those in our classes, as well as car seat and safety information.”

    Dads, grandparents, partners and family who will spend time with the baby are welcome to attend and will have the opportunity to get their Tdap vaccination. Tdap is a vaccination that helps prevent tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis and is highly recommended for anyone who will be in the presence of a newborn.

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  • Warm Fuzzies for Kids Brings Comfort to Pediatric Patients

    Friday February 17, 2017

    Members of the media are invited to the Warm Fuzzies for Kids volunteer event from 11 a.m. to noon on Feb. 18 in the Centennial rooms, first floor, Pozez Education Center, located within Stormont Vail Hospital.

    Stormont Vail Health Volunteer Services and the Stormont Vail Foundation are joining together to sponsor and support this kick-off event. Volunteers will make “no sew” fleece blankets for pediatric patients to use during their hospital stay and to bring home after discharge. A goal of 80 fleece blankets is set for Saturday. This amount will meet the need for up to two to three months.

    Two 3-hour shifts are offered for anyone wanting to volunteer from either 9 a.m. to noon or 1 to 4 p.m., and project supplies and light refreshments will be furnished. Each shift can accommodate a maximum of 80 volunteers. Volunteers 13 years or younger are welcome, but must be accompanied by an adult.

    “Blankets are frequently requested for patients to provide comfort and cheer but the supply can be depleted in the colder months,” said Jane Mackey, president of the Stormont Vail Foundation. “This project will ensure that we have an adequate supply of blankets when they are needed.”

    “Community members frequently inquire about special opportunities to volunteer without making a long-term commitment, such as high school studentsm who need to meet community volunteer service requirements for graduation,” said Beverly Rice, director of Stormont Vail Health Volunteer Services. “Many major employers are also looking for opportunities for their employees to give back to the community. Our hope is this event is one of the many new volunteer opportunities that connect our community with Stormont Vail Health.”

    A few volunteer spots are still open. For more information or to register as a volunteer, contact Stormont Vail Health Volunteer Services at (785) 354-6095 or by email at volunteerdept@stormontvail.org. Please be sure to include your name, address, age, phone number and the shift you are interested in attending.

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  • New Guidelines Indicate Introducing Peanut-Containing Products to Infants Can Prevent Allergies

    Tuesday January 31, 2017

    The National Institutes of Health issued new guidelines earlier this month saying most babies should regularly eat peanut-containing foods starting around 6 months of age, some as early as 4 months.        

    The recommendations are based on landmark research that found early exposure is far more likely to protect babies from developing peanut allergies than to harm them.  

    “People with allergies have been desensitizing themselves for many years by getting small doses of things they are allergic to,” said Preeti Singh, M.D., Cotton O’Neil Manhattan. “In fact, this study isn’t too different than that, and if successful, can prevent many deaths and complications in our general population. We have peanut exposure in chocolate, for example, and it is hard for most children to resist candies.”

    The guidelines explain how exactly to introduce infants to age-appropriate peanut products depending on whether they’re at high, moderate or low risk of becoming allergic as they grow.

    Whole peanuts or even a spoonful of creamy peanut butter may be a choking hazard for infants and is not recommended for them. Instead, the guidelines include options such as watered-down peanut butter or easy-to-gum peanut-flavored “puff” snacks.

    Babies at high risk – because they have a severe form of skin rash, eczema or egg allergies – need a check-up before exposure and should receive their first taste in the doctor’s office. For other babies, most parents can start adding peanut-containing foods to their diet much like they introduce oatmeal or mashed fruits and vegetables. Giving any peanut-containing food should always be done when a parent or caregiver can monitor the infant for up to two hours after trying the food to make sure there are no reactions such as itching, rash or difficulty breathing. If there is a reaction, be sure to take the infant to a doctor.

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  • Stormont Vail Health Chief Human Resources Officer to Retire in 2017

    Tuesday January 31, 2017

    Bernard H. Becker, SPHR(L), SHRM-SCP, vice president and chief human resources officer at Stormont Vail Health, has announced his intent to retire before October 2017. Becker oversees Recruitment, Compensation & Benefits, Employee Relations, Employee Health, Education & Staff Development, Medical Education, the Stauffer Health Sciences Library, Spiritual Care, Volunteer Services & Auxiliary and the child care center.

    “While I am sad to be leaving an organization I’m so proud of, I am also excited to spend more time with my wife Barb and our family,” Becker said.

     Becker has been a part of Stormont Vail Health for more than 19 years. He joined Stormont Vail from 1980-1983 as the assistant director of personnel. He re-joined the system in 2001 as the vice president of Human Resources, later changing titles to vice president and chief human resources officer.

    “Bernie has been a great leader for Stormont Vail Health, contributing to our growth,” said Randy Peterson, president and chief executive officer. “During his tenure we’ve grown from about 2,500 employees to more than 4,800.”

    Becker has almost 40 years of human resources experience and has served as the chief human resources officer for multiple hospitals and health care systems in Michigan and Missouri. Additionally, Becker worked for three years as vice president and a consultant for a national health care human resources and labor relations firm. Born and raised in Kanas City and a Vietnam War-era U.S. Army veteran, Becker has a bachelor’s degree in Personnel Administration and Psychology from the University of Kansas and a master’s degree in Personnel Management from Central Michigan University.

    A retirement reception will be announced at a later date. Stormont Vail Health is conducting a nationwide search for Becker’s replacement.

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  • New Guidelines Indicate Introducing Peanut-Containing Products to Infants Can Prevent Allergies

    Thursday January 26, 2017

    The National Institutes of Health issued new guidelines earlier this month saying most babies should regularly eat peanut-containing foods starting around 6 months of age, some as early as 4 months.        

    The recommendations are based on landmark research that found early exposure is far more likely to protect babies from developing peanut allergies than to harm them.  

    “This is an exciting development in the allergy field,” said Christy Jansen, M.D., pediatrician at Cotton O’Neil Emporia. “Peanut allergy affects one to two percent of children and can be lifelong. It can cause anxiety in parents as well. The ability to perhaps prevent peanut allergy by early exposure is great.”

    The guidelines explain how exactly to introduce infants to age-appropriate peanut products depending on whether they’re at high, moderate or low risk of becoming allergic as they grow.

    Whole peanuts or even a spoonful of creamy peanut butter may be a choking hazard for infants and it is not recommended for them. Instead, the guidelines include options such as watered-down peanut butter or easy-to-gum peanut-flavored “puff” snacks.

    Babies at high risk – because they have a severe form of skin rash eczema or egg allergies – need a check-up before exposure and should receive their first taste in the doctor’s office. For other babies, most parents can start adding peanut-containing foods to the diet much like they introduce oatmeal or mashed fruits and vegetables. Giving any peanut-containing food should always be done when a parentor caregiver can monitor the infant for up to two hours after they try the food to make sure there are no reactions such as itching, rash or difficulty breathing. If there is, be sure to take them to a doctor.

    Dr. Jansen encourages parents to contact their child’s physician to discuss how to introduce peanuts into their child’s diet as there are different recommendations depending on health history.

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